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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 7, 2017 8:00pm-8:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines... 11 people are injured in an accident outside london's natural history museum, after a car struck pedestrians. i heard a couple of loud bangs. didn't think too much of it. i thought it was a car backfiring or something. then there were screams and a large crowd came through. police say a man has been arrested following the incident, which they are treating as a road traffic accident. the prime minister says her thoughts are with the injured. the unite union calls on the government to step up its efforts to protectjobs, after the us hikes tariffs on aircraft made by bombardier, one of northern ireland's largest employers. calls for unity in spain, as tens of thousands demonstrate in madrid following last weekend's disputed referendum for catalan independence. senior conservatives rally around the prime minister — borisjohnson tells mps
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to get behind theresa may and turn the fire onjeremy corbyn. lewis hamilton puts himself in the driving seat, taking pole for tomorrow's japanese grand prix. and in half an hour here on bbc news, inside out takes a look at racism in football, and asks whether our clubs should be doing more to recruit asian players. good evening and welcome to bbc news. scotland yard says an incident outside the natural history museum in london — where a car collided with pedestrians — is not being treated as terrorism. officers say it was
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a traffic accident. 11 people were injured, nine have been taken to hospital. a man detained by officers is under arrest and in police custody. the prime minister has said: "my thanks to the first responders this afternoon, and the actions of members of the public. my thoughts are with the injured." the incident took place on exhibition road, which passes right next to the natural history museum and other popular tourist attractions, including the science museum and the royal albert hall. this report from june kelly. a black car close to the natural history museum quickly became the object of attention for police. it followed an incident in which 11 people were hurt after a car drove onto the pavement. the london ambulance service said they mainly treated head and leg injuries, with nine taken to hospital. none have
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life—threatening or life changing industries. —— injuries. armed officers were quick to swoop on the area shortly after the incident reported at 2:20pm. eyewitnesses say they cleared the area as quickly as possible. we ran with everybody else. everything seemed to calm down. we try to walk back to the natural history museum. then everything went mental with police ca i’s everything went mental with police cars and there was locked down. there was an initial panic as people i’ui'i there was an initial panic as people run around the corners. that first 30 seconds was panicked. very quickly edited calm down. a man detained at the scene is now under arrest and in custody. footage online showed four men pinning an individual to the ground. the met are treating it as a road traffic accident and not a terror related incident. this home of london is home to the victoria and albert and science home to the victoria and albert and science museums. home to the victoria and albert and science museums. they attract
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millions of visitors each year. the prime minister put a message on twitter thanking the emergency services and of the public, and seeing her thoughts were with the injured. jane francis kelly, bbc news. our home affairs correspondent, dominic casciani, has been at the scene this evening. he gave this update a short time ago. in many respects the traffic is now moving outside the natural history museum, next to the victoria and albert. effectively things beginning to return to normal after this very abnormal afternoon here in west london. when we arrived two hours ago you had the full police kit, all the resources of a major investigation, swinging into action after this strange accident in which 11 people have been injured. when we arrived there was a large police cordon. it went back to the edges of the museums. the south kensington tube was closed off. local bars and restau ra nts com pletely evacuated. everything was very calm. the police
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had effectively triggered a well drilled response to a potential serious incident. the worst—case scenario was this might be terrorism. they put these plans into action by shifting people as quickly as possible. people in bars and restau ra nts, as possible. people in bars and restaurants, tourist were told to get away as far as possible, while they said up this containment area. ifi they said up this containment area. if i move out of vision, what you will see behind me in behind the traffic is the actual car at the centre of this. you can see it. it is effectively wedged at the end of the pavement on exhibition road. this leads between the natural history museum, the science museum and the victoria and albert. it was that car which mounted the pavement. we are not sure why that was. it ended where it is now. scenes of crimes officers have been here. we saw a dog section at one point, a lwa ys saw a dog section at one point, always an indication they may be
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looking for traces of explosives and things like that. that is the kind of resource of the police will bring to bear on something which, on the face of it, looks like terrorism but tha nkfully face of it, looks like terrorism but thankfully in this case has just turned out to be a road traffic accident. the driver himself currently in custody. and we'll find out how this story — and many others — are covered in the front pages of the sunday papers at 10:30 and 11:30pm this evening in the papers. our guests joining me tonight, are martin lipton, deputy head of sport at the sun, and the political commentator, daisy mcandrew. there are renewed fears for the future of jobs at the bombardier aerospace factory in belfast. the us government has announced a further increase in tariffs on planes made by the company, making it prohibitively expensive to import them. the united states claims bombardier has received unfair financial support from the uk and canada — where the planes are assembled. our business correspondent, joe lynam, reports.
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bombardier and its predecessor, short‘s, have been at the heart of the manufacturing economy in belfast for decades. 4000 skilled workers make high—tech composite wings in a province which doesn't have many of those jobs. but over the past fortnight, potential american tariffs have placed a huge question mark over their future. now, in a new blow, the us commerce department has slapped a further 80% tariff on bombardier planes, meaning all of its largest aircraft could soon face import duties of up to 300% in america. it looms very large over these workers and it's time for this british government to actually step up for british workers. we see it within britain being bullied now. the british government being bullied by boeing. the eu needs to step in because of the fact they're being bullied now, too. it needs to stop, it needs to stop now. and for bombardier workers it's a waiting game. we know we've still got a job to do. and keep our fingers crossed
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we are keeping that one down and keep working away you know. it'll affect the whole company, probably. whatever the outcome is. and this is the plane that the americans object to. the c series is assembled in canada with wings made and sent from belfast. but the americans claim it has received $1 billion in subsidies from the canadians, which allows it to undercut boeing in bidding for contracts. this whole row puts the government, especially the business department, in something of a bind. it is kept in power by the dup. the bombardierfactory is dup heartland. but boeing, which initiated these tariffs, employs even more people, almost 19,000 people, elsewhere in the uk. and it's building a new factory in sheffield. we have an international regulatory regime which has worked extremely well. these type of measures threaten competition and innovation and as a consequence that's bad news for consumers wherever they are.
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these 300% tariffs are recommendations by one branch of the us government. if there is no solution, though, they will come into force in february. in that time, the nails of thousands of workers here, and trade negotiators on both sides of the atlantic, will be bitten down to the quick. joe lynam, bbc news. some breaking news coming in. it has been reported a woman has been arrested after trying to scale the front gates at buckingham palace. this news coming in from scotland yard. awoman this news coming in from scotland yard. a woman has been arrested after trying to scale the front gates of buckingham palace. a recent security breach also took place at buckingham palace some weeks ago. that is the news we have at the
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moment. a woman has been arrested after trying to scale the front gates of buckingham palace. that news coming from scotland yard. tens of thousands of people have rallied in the spanish capital madrid — calling for national unity after last sunday's disputed referendum for catalan independence. the spanish government has said it will not allow catalonia to break away. last weekend hundreds of people were injured as national police attempted to disrupt the vote. from madrid, james reynolds reports. demonstrators in spain's capital have chosen to display their colours. thousands of people in madrid came out to say that this country should not be broken into pieces, and that catalonia must give up its plans to declare independence. by contrast, these demonstrators in ba rcelona's sa nt jaume square stripped themselves of spanish or even catalan colours. they're from a new campaign group called "shall we talk?"
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i am here personally because i think that we need a dialogue. politicians haven't been doing theirjob really well. 0ur sole objective is that people, above all politicians, talk to each other. we've seen for too long a confrontation between both sides and we think now the people have to show that we want dialogue. a similar demonstration in favour of dialogue was held here in the southern city of alicante. the middle ground in spain is now trying to make itself heard. police in russia have detained more than a hundred opposition activists for taking part in a wave of anti—kremlin protests across the country. the demonstrations were in support of opposition leader alexei navalny, who is serving a 20—day jail term for violating rules on public meetings. a criminal conviction means
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he can't run for next year's presidential election, which navalny supporters say was politically motivated. president vladimir putin is widely expected to run for the fourth term. president vladimir putin is widely expected to run for the fourth time. 0ur correspondent sarah rainsford is in moscow and sent this update a short time ago. these are extraordinary scenes for russia. this crowd is heading down russia's main street to the kremlin, and they are chanting slogans against president putin, calling him a thief and corrupt. they are now heading to the kremlin. the riot police are accompanying them but at the moment they are not intervening, they are escorting them down the street. you are not afraid to be here? we have no choice, we must be here. we have no future with putin. the only chance for us in this country, not to live abroad is alexei navalny. the point is to support
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alexei navalny‘s bid to run for the presidency. he has gathered crowds in support for the bid for the presidency. officially he is not allowed to run because he has a criminal sentence but he says he has huge support and wants to prove that by being allowed to run. they are heading to the underpass and the police have moved in to block the way through to red square and the kremlin and have done the same above ground, trying to keep protesters as far away as possible from the seat of power. perhaps the strangest thing about this is it appears to have ended without mass arrests. the riot police normally move in quickly in situations like this but this time the police seem to have stood back and let the protest take place. that was sarah rainsford. an update
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on some breaking news. a woman has been arrested after she was caught trying to scale the front gates of buckingham palace. this confirmation from scotland yard. it happened at 1740, 5:40pm today. 0fficers observed the woman climbing the front gates of the palace. she is believed to be in her 30s. she was quickly detained by officers before gaining access to the palace grounds. the statesmanship —— said she was arrested on suspicion of trespass. the incident is not being treated as terror related and the woman is currently in custody at a central london police station. that is the latest on that. more if we get it. foreign secretary borisjohnson has become the latest senior party figure to voice his support
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for theresa may, telling a messaging group of conservative mps that they should "get behind the pm". his intervention comes after ex—party chairman grant shapps said about 30 tory mps backed his call for a leadership contest. mrjohnson said: it comes after the leader of the scottish conservatives, ruth davidson, told critics of the prime minister to "put up, or shut up". ms davidson is viewed by some as a potential contender to lead the party in westminster. iain watson reports. grant shapps has received plenty
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of advice from colleagues, with some mps and peers literally telling him to shut up. most of the party strongly support... i think we have two roads we can go down. we can behave like knuckleheads, like grant shapps did today... knuckleheads, really? well, what else was it? it was just trying to act against the prime minister. or we can unite, support the prime minister. ruth davidson has added her voice to the chorus of cutting comments, suggesting that if the plot against the prime minister had been serious, then it would have been led by someone more serious. but she had a wider message for party members, too, advising them to settle down. jeremy corbyn is eminently beatable. not only that, we have just beaten him. yes, i know it can be daunting, when you've got people chanting in the streets the name of somebody else, but that does not mean you don't knuckle down, get stuck in, show the drive, energy, the ambition for the country. make sure people understand what it is that you are trying to do in politics, why you are trying to do it, how it is going to benefit their lives.
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that is what the party should be getting on with right now. she acknowledged that there would be instability if the prime minister were toppled, but pledged her own support now and in the future. there has been a very public closing of the ranks at the top of the party following the perceived threat from mr shapps. he doesn't have enough support to force a leadership contest. but, one of his fellow rebels, a former cabinet minister, suggested privately that the prime minister was just one crisis away from losing herjob. ian watson, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news: 11 people have been injured in an accident outside london's natural history museum, after a car mounted the pavement and struck pedestrians. police say it's not terror—related — a man has been arrested following the accident. the prime minister says her thoughts are with the injured. and there are renewed fears for the future of jobs at the bombardier aircraft factory in belfast, after the us government announced a further increase in tariffs on planes made by the canadian company. now over to the bbc
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sports centre for an update. good evening. we will start with by good evening. we will start with rugby league. leeds rhinos have won the super league grand final for a record eighth time. they finished a distant second behind castleford in the league table but were superior throughout at old trafford this evening. two tries from danny mcguire and two from tom briscoe saw them to the title by 24—6. champions exeter have beaten newcastle to move above them and into the top spot of by above them and into the top spot of rugby union's aviva premiership. the closest game of the day was out the madejski stadium where leicester looked very comfortable for most of the game, jonny may's converted try
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putting on 16 points clear with 16 minutes left. but london irish battled until the end to get within a point. the final score 28—27 to leicester. there were also wins for gloucester and bath. leinster beat munster in the pro14. england have made sure of their place at next yea r‘s world cup made sure of their place at next year's world cup but a rude to russia via the play—offs remains a possibility for the rest of the home nations heading into the final round of qualifying matches. scotland are in slovenia and of their match against them tomorrow. despite the obvious pressure, manager gordon strachan cut relaxed figure. yeah, i'm enjoying the build—up at the moment. it is more of the match day feeling that is coming. unless you are a manager you day feeling that is coming. unless you are a manager you have day feeling that is coming. unless you are a manager you have not got a clue what that is like. as soon as you open your eyes in the morning,
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there is a game on and you know there is a game on and you know there is. no pressure for a gareth southgate after his team confirmed qualification against slovenia on thursday. the england manager preparing to bring injack butland joe hart for theirfinal against lithuania. southgate says he's looking for a much improved performance from his side. the other night we didn't perform at the level we wanted to. none of us are going to dress that up any differently. the objective of qualification is now achieved. now the desire is, how far can we go? how do we improve the team? that process starts tomorrow. lewis hamilton says he is driving better than ever after taking his tent pole position in 16 races ahead of the japanese grand prix. he broke the track record three times to take his 7ist track record three times to take his 71st career pole. it is is first at suzuka. he was quicker than valtteri
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bottas, penalised for a gearbox change. it is sebastian vettel who're line—up against hamilton of the top of the grid. max whitlock has become the first british gymnast to retain a world title by taking gold in the pommel horse at montreal. he beat his russian opponent in to second place, with the new world all—round champion from china taking bronze. later in canada, courtney tulloch will aim to be the first briton to win a world medal in the ring final. two former world boxing champions go head—to—head in manchester tonight with ricky facing anthony crolla in a lightweight class that could produce another world title shot. there was no trash talking in the build—up. mutual respect between the fighters as they prepare for a contest neither man can afford to lose. i look at every fright as the most important of my career because if it goes wrong it scuppers your future plans. the winner will go back to
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where we both feel we belong, challenging for world titles. for the loser, you have to drop down a level, which none of us like doing. i have no plans on retiring just yet. i know what is on the line. but i'm confident i will come through it. and that is all the sport. john, thank you. we're going to update you on some breaking news coming into us at bbc news. it has been reported, and this is confirmed by the met police, that at 5:40pm officers in the area of buckingham palace had observed a woman climbing the front gates of the palace itself. she is believed to be in her 30s and she was quickly detained by officers before she gained access to the palace grounds. the statement says she was arrested on suspicion of trespass under
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section 128 of the serious or as crime and police act of 2005. she is currently in custody at a central london police station. we don't know her motivations but the police are saying the incident is not being treated as terror related. that incident, an update from the metropolitan police, taking place at buckingham palace. some councils say they're not getting the money they need to carry out urgent safety improvements on tower blocks following the grenfell disaster. a number of local authorities in england and wales say requests for government funds for refurbishment are being rejected because they're deemed non—essential. angus crawford explains. it was a fire no one thought possible. flames engulfing the building, spreading through the cladding in minutes. raising urgent questions about blocks like these in billingham. 0r here on merseyside. fire tests showed more than 100 weren't safe. some residents had to be evacuated,
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leaving them fearful, confused and frustrated. four miles from grenfell, councillor adam hug says these flats need millions of pounds of repairs. for blocks such as this across westminster and across the country, there needs to have sprinklers retrofitted. for now the government won't pay, leaving the council to foot the bill. nothing is coming from government, and that means fewer affordable homes will be built and residents will be dealing with poorer repairs for the next 20—30 years. the horror of what happened here exposed dangers in buildings across the country. rightly or wrongly, some councils believe the government made a pledge to pay for all the work to make tower blocks safe. after the fire, public anger mounted, and ministers promised action. whatever it takes we will take the expert advice, do whatever it
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takes to make those buildings safe, or make those people safe. whatever it takes. we have to be led by the experts but there can be no short cuts to this. but today the government said building owners are responsible for funding measures designed to make a building safe. and urged councils to come forward if they had funding concerns. it was a national tragedy. but who now will pay to make sure it never happens again? an estimated 100,000 catholics have taken part in prayers on the polish border. it has been controversial. people we re it has been controversial. people
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were bussed from more than 300 churches to point all along the polish borders. lines of the faithful study in the sand as the waves of the baltic sea laps behind them. 0thers prayed in fields and towns. translation: we come to the borders of poland to pray for the polls and the whole world. we want our catholic faith to continue to keep our children safe. the prayerfell on the feast of our lady of the rosary, when catholics commemorate the victory of the christian forces over the ottomans in 1571. some priests and church commentators said the event could be seen as support for the government's refusal to accept muslim migrants. polish bishops have urged the government to assist syrian refugees but the plan has failed to secure political backing. organisers say there is nothing political about the event.
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translation: we turn to god for peace and reconciliation in our region and throughout the world, so the same values can dominate throughout europe and the world. the border was chosen, they said because it symbolised their desire to encompass the world with prayer. people across the uk could be treated to the sight of dozens of shooting stars, when the draco—nid meteor shower peaks this weekend. it is most likely to be clearest in the direction of the constellation of draco — the dragon — in the northern sky, in the early evening. it's one of two meteor shows that can be seen during october. how will the weather be looking? hello. in true october fashion saturday has been a mishmash of whether at its very best. no complaints if you please. but it wasn't like that everywhere. quite a
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bit of cloud around. some braved the waters. then they had a fairly cold -- thick waters. then they had a fairly cold —— thick coat so to do. overnight, cloud across the british isles, a breeze for many. cloud and rain not 1 million miles from the west of cornwall. a fairly dull start to the day across northern ireland. bits and pieces of rain. i am hopeful by comparison to saturday, some more will see a bit more in a way of sunshine. still the chance of rain in the irish sea moving into the north midlands. rain in western scotland. with a bit of sunshine tucked away in the breeze, 18 in the south—east. a lot of dry weather to start the new week on monday. more cloud, wind and rain in the north of scotland. hello, this is bbc news with lu kwesa burak. the headlines at 8:30. 11 people have been injured in an accident outside london's natural history museum after a car mounted the pavement and struck pedestrians. i heard a couple of loud bangs,
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didn't really think much of it, cos you just think it's a car backfiring or something, and then there were some screams and a large crowd came through. police say it's not terror—related. a man has been arrested following the accident. the prime minister says her thoughts are with the injured. a woman has been arrested after trying to scale the gates of buckingham palace, she is being held on suspicion of trespass. there are renewed fears for the future of jobs at the bombardier aircraft factory in belfast after the us government announced a further increase in tariffs on planes made by the canadian company. in other new, rallies are taking place across spain as tensions continue over catalonia's bid for independence. now on bbc news, inside out. welcome to inside out.
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tonight, racism in football — should our clubs be doing more to recruit british asian players? i think it is ourjob, it's the football clubs responsibility to go and find out where they are playing football. where have all the hen harriers gone? is the shooting industry to blame? it is a national disgrace that we do not have the kind of birds of prey that should belong back in this landscape.

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